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Socalmountains.com :: Forums :: GENERAL DISCUSSION
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Taxafornia July 1

Author Post
Skyline Drive
Thu Jul 02 2020, 08:53AM Email Thread Print View

Registered Member #191
Joined: Tue Dec 05 2006, 06:43AM
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Posts: 3061
LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – California’s gas tax increased Wednesday by 3.2 cents per gallon.

The tax hike, which took effect on the first day of the new fiscal year, July 1, now brings California’s gas tax to 50.5 cents per gallon. The increase is based on the state’s inflation index.

The hike is part of Senate Bill 1, the Road Repair & Accountability Act, which the California Legislature passed in April of 2017 and includes increases in gas taxes and vehicle registration fees.

The bill is designed to raise over $5 billion per year for road repairs and infrastructure improvements.

When it took affect in November of 2017, it increased the gas tax by 12 cents. It then went up another 5.6 cents in July of 2019, to 47.3 cents per gallon.

It increases annually based on the California Consumer Price Index.

California’s gas prices have been consistently higher compared to the rest of the nation. Last October, Gov. Gavin Newsom asked the attorney general to investigate why.

Millennia’s sorry to tell you that there is no Santa Clause, no Easter Bunny, No Tooth Fairy, Have a great day
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Skyline Drive
Thu Jul 02 2020, 09:04AM

Registered Member #191
Joined: Tue Dec 05 2006, 06:43AM
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Posts: 3061
California’s Solution for a Looming Covid-19 Budget Disaster Paul Tullis 6/10/2020
No fireworks no problem: 7 creative ways to celebrate Fourth of… Joblessness falls to 11.1% as more states reopen Bloomberg logo California’s Solution for a Looming Covid-19 Budget Disaster

(Bloomberg) -- With 45 million children in 43 states already enjoying an extended summer vacation, school boards and legislators are trying to determine how the coronavirus recession will affect K-12 funding for the next academic year and beyond.
a group of people flying kites in front of a building: Pedestrians walk past a closed high school in Hollywood, California, on March 16. © Photographer: Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images Pedestrians walk past a closed high school in Hollywood, California, on March 16.

Since U.S. lockdowns first began, governors in eight states signed bills to free up funding for disadvantaged students in poorly funded public schools, some where students often arrive hungry or have undiagnosed learning disabilities. Now, six states are considering November ballot measures to boost school funding or change financing mechanisms to help disadvantaged students.

These include Arizona, where taxes would be raised on incomes above $250,000 to boost teacher salaries; Colorado, which is targeting corporations for at least $151 million in taxes to fund out-of-school learning; and North Carolina, which would issue bonds worth $1.9 billion in part to pay for school capital improvements.

But it’s a ballot measure in California that may have the biggest effect, upending the business property tax structure to free up as much as $12.5 billion annually for public schools (K-12 education currently receives $97.2 billion from state, local and federal sources). The measure, if adopted, could set a new standard for how property taxes are used in other states. It would certainly help California deal with its projected $54 billion shortfall.

Property taxes are a key component of public school funding in America, a fact that has historically created high-performing schools in wealthy neighborhoods and poor-performing schools in poor neighborhoods. Economic stratification in America, often along racial lines, has long been attributed in part to this mechanism of school funding.

California’s ballot initiative wouldn’t change that system. Rather, its proponents say it would make it more fair. Under the state’s heretofore untouchable Proposition 13, which took effect in 1978, property is re-assessed only when it changes hands or is redeveloped, a boon to longtime landowners. The California Schools and Local Communities Funding Act of 2020, however, would assess the market value of some business properties every three years. Given high property values in some parts of the state, this “split-roll” measure could mean big money for public schools.

“We’re ensuring that if you started a business yesterday and the person next to you started theirs 40 years ago, that they don’t pay the same taxes they did 40 years ago,” said Alex Stack, communications director for Schools & Communities First, an organization of school district officials and labor groups behind the initiative. Stack points to a study from the University of Southern California showing that 78% of the revenue generated would come from just 6% of the property owners.

“A $12 billion tax increase will simply exacerbate the cost of living situation in California.”

The ballot measure would affect any parcel owned by an entity whose total commercial or industrial land holdings exceed $3 million. The proposal seeks to protect small business owners, while big companies that own a large number of small properties (like a restaurant chain) must pay up. The new law would hold the maximum tax rate to 1% while offering some exemptions.

Proposition 13 has long been defended as a lifeline to senior citizens in California who, without it, might have trouble paying property tax bills. But its most powerful defenders have been corporations and other owners of high-value commercial and industrial properties that have saved billions of dollars over the years.

“We have the highest marginal income tax rate in America, the highest sales tax rate in America, the highest gas tax in America, and the highest corporate tax west of the Mississippi,” said Jon Coupal, president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, a lobbyist group which actively opposes the ballot measure. “The costs of businesses are invariably passed along to consumers, and a $12 billion tax increase will simply exacerbate the cost of living situation in California.”

“What’s happening now will have a much more significant impact than the Great Recession.”

With the recession likely to slash states’ revenue for years to come, schools are going to need help from somewhere. Many are still recovering from the last economic downturn. By 2017, the last year for which complete data was available, spending on elementary and secondary education in 22 states had yet to recover to levels prior to the Great Recession, according to an April report from the Albert Shanker Institute, a Washington-based nonprofit.

As state coffers empty to fight Covid-19, many school districts “will be facing a possibly unprecedented funding crisis while they are still digging out from the last one,” wrote senior research fellow Matthew DiCarlo and Bruce Baker of the Rutgers University Graduate School of Education.

The effects of the 2008 financial crisis were most severe in districts that could least afford the cutbacks, and occurred amid 25-year declines in both state revenue and state spending on education as a share of personal income. This time may be worse.

“What’s happening now will have a much more significant impact than the Great Recession,” said Phil Vaccaro of the consulting firm EY-Parthenon, partly because of the social-emotional and academic setbacks resulting from a truncated school year, as well as trauma felt by families of the 111,000 Americans killed in the pandemic, the most of any nation by far. “It will be felt disproportionately by students from low-income families, with special education needs, and in earlier grades,” he said.

The $13 billion in aid to K-12 schools nationwide in the federal Covid-19 bailout was about one-quarter of what Washington provided in 2009, while the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a left-leaning research institute in Washington, calculates state budget shortfalls for fiscal 2021 alone will amount to $290 billion.

California’s schools rank in the middle of states by per-student spending. Before 1978, California was near the top. But in the years after Proposition 13, it fell toward toward the bottom. The recent climb back up is largely a function of other states’ declines.

When it comes to education funding and outcomes, size does matter, Baker said. “Significant additional investments in schooling have led to better outcomes, and recessionary cuts have led to flattening and declining outcomes,” he said.

That’s largely because education is labor-intensive: The biggest line item in school budgets is staff—around 70%, according to Vaccaro—though the average starting salary in the U.S. is below $40,000. Baker predicted that the California initiative “could serve as a timely counterbalance” to looming revenue falloffs.

Coupal, the business lobbyist, contends California schools are already getting what they need. Rex Hime, president of the California Business Properties Association, added that under the new tax regime, “there’s going to be a significant upheaval among the smaller owners.”

“Some folks had their property tax in place for 20 years,” Hime said. “Suddenly they’re going to get a tax bill reflecting a 2020 value rather than a 2000 value, and they’re going to be very hard-pressed to make those payments.”

Read More: California Bets on Trump’s Help With $54 Billion Budget Gap

Willie Brown, the former San Francisco mayor and speaker of the State Assembly, agreed. The Democrat wrote in Cal Matters, a news site on state policy, that a significant percentage of California businesses are minority owned, and many rent from entities that will be forced to pay more. (Because of Covid-19 shutdowns, there has already been a 41% decline in black-owned businesses.)

“African American-owned small businesses are nearly twice as likely to fail because they have insufficient cash flow or sales to cover their costs than U.S. businesses as a whole,” Brown wrote. If their landlord qualifies for re-assessment, he warned, they will pay the price next time their lease is up.

Millennia’s sorry to tell you that there is no Santa Clause, no Easter Bunny, No Tooth Fairy, Have a great day
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Skyline Drive
Thu Jul 02 2020, 09:11AM

Registered Member #191
Joined: Tue Dec 05 2006, 06:43AM
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Posts: 3061
Split roll measure not only a costly job-killer, but difficult to implement

A proposition on the Nov. 3, 2020 ballot could dramatically increase property taxes for commercial properties. (iStockphoto)
By The Editorial Board | opinion©scng.com |
PUBLISHED: June 11, 2020 at 11:07 a.m. | UPDATED: June 11, 2020 at 11:07 a.m.

The California Assessors’ Association has come out in opposition to a recently qualified November ballot initiative that would change Proposition 13 to require the reassessment of many commercial and industrial properties to current market value.

In a letter to state lawmakers, CAA President Don Gaekle, assessor for Stanislaus County, cited the “immense anticipated statewide implementation costs and complexities, as well as the disparate impacts to the various California counties as the reasons the assessors felt “compelled” to oppose the measure that proponents have named The California Schools and Local Communities Funding Act of 2020.

Santa Clara County Assessor Larry Stone told lawmakers during an informational hearing on June 4 that the California Assessors’ Association completed a comprehensive analysis of the so-called “split roll” initiative with the goal of answering one question: Can assessors implement the initiative?

“Our conclusion is we cannot,” he testified, “It would be impossible — not difficult, but impossible — to administer all of the provisions of the measure as it is written.”

The assessors’ concerns fall broadly into three categories: cost, staffing and exemptions.

The cost to implement the initiative, according to the assessors’ analysis, is projected to be about $1 billion during a three-year phase-in period, not counting an estimated 36 percent increase in costs in related government offices such as county controllers, tax collectors, assessment appeals boards or county counsels. The cost estimate also does not include likely salary increases needed to recruit and retain hundreds of new professional appraisers.

Although the counties are supposed to be reimbursed for implementation costs from the additional tax revenue, the CAA says it isn’t clear that all the extra expenses will be reimbursed, and it further notes that some small and rural counties will see less revenue, not more, because of exclusions and offsetting tax breaks.

Beyond the cost and staffing concerns, the assessors warned that the split-roll measure contains exclusions and exceptions that are “impossible” to implement. For example, commercial property valued at $3 million or less would not be reassessed to market value under the measure as long as “none of the entity’s owners have a cumulative fair market value in excess of $3 million adjusted every 2 years, starting in 2025, by a floating inflation factor” that will vary from county to county. This information is not readily available in any database.

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Additionally, a temporary deferral until 2025 of new assessment provisions applies to commercial and industrial property where 50 percent or more of the occupied square footage is occupied by “small business,” defined as having 50 or fewer annual full-time employees and “not subject to control, restriction, modification or limitation by an outside source, individual or another business,” a condition difficult if not impossible for assessors to verify.

However, for all the effort to exempt small businesses from reassessment and higher taxes, any small business that leases space from a larger business and has a “triple net lease” will be paying the higher property taxes that are imposed on the property owner. That’s a higher cost for small businesses, there’s no way around it.

The California Schools and Local Communities Funding Act is an ill-advised effort to replace Proposition 13 with a new patchwork of higher and unpredictable property taxes for California businesses.

In the words of Santa Clara County Assessor Larry Stone, “This is a seriously flawed ballot measure, and it should be defeated.”

Millennia’s sorry to tell you that there is no Santa Clause, no Easter Bunny, No Tooth Fairy, Have a great day
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NShore.Allen
Thu Jul 02 2020, 11:03AM

wanna be UTH
Registered Member #4616
Joined: Sat Jul 28 2012, 04:37PM
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Posts: 2405
There are unintended consequences to implementation of the law. First as stated above, counties are not equipped to re-asses or appraise every commercial property. Second, due to COVID, commercial properties are going vacant. Tennants are not paying rent and malls are empty. It will be quite a surprise when the assessments come in lower than current values. The counties would then be required to pay refunds.



A smile is a curve that can set things a lot of things straight
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Skyline Drive
Fri Jul 03 2020, 07:03AM

Registered Member #191
Joined: Tue Dec 05 2006, 06:43AM
:
Posts: 3061
NShore.Allen wrote ...

There are unintended consequences to implementation of the law. First as stated above, counties are not equipped to re-asses or appraise every commercial property. Second, due to COVID, commercial properties are going vacant. Tennants are not paying rent and malls are empty. It will be quite a surprise when the assessments come in lower than current values. The counties would then be required to pay refunds.




Split Tax on property-residential-agriculture, what about the camps
It just what the parasites are thinking of and some that have been implemented. The split tax roll, just another way of fleecing

Prop 6 passed this stuff will be on a ballot

Millennia’s sorry to tell you that there is no Santa Clause, no Easter Bunny, No Tooth Fairy, Have a great day
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